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STATISTICS:
Judaism is one of the oldest religions still existing today. Today, 14 million people identify themselves as Jews, and nearly 3.5 billion others follow belief systems directly influenced by Judaism (including Christianity, Islam, and the Bahá’í Faith).
In everyday life, observant Jews follow the laws of kashrut, eating only foods that God has designated "kosher."
Home-Made Religion
Achinoam Nini
IsraelGALLERYCONVERSATION
 Media Center
Stop.
It’s 3:15
You have one minute.
Are you ready?


Now think of all things created
Think of those that you care for
Think of what you've been blessed with
And everything that makes you afraid

Wish for anything
Let yourself dream
Wish for things to get better
Until 3:16

There's a stone in my garden that keeps me committed
And close to the ground when I feel I should run
There's a branch in my window that helps me remember
To reach out my arms and touch the sun.

There are two million ants that live in my sidewalk
Working together to nurture and feed
And the old TV set, with the sad evening news
So I never forget how much love we need

Home-made religion
(In my kitchen)
Home-made religion.

Think of how you've been feeling
And how you've made others feel
Think of what you've been given
And what you need to heal

Wish for anything.
Try to keep still
Wish for things to get better
And maybe they will

There’s a plant in the corner that helps me remember
All of the beauty that grows from a seed
And the old TV set, with the sad evening news
So I never forget how much love we need

Home-made religion
(In my kitchen)
Home-made religion.

Stop.

***

"Home-Made Religion"

I once invented a little ritual for myself. It has to do with digital clocks and silent prayers, but it’s my little secret so I can’t disclose it (it is hidden in the lyrics of the song, though). All I can say is that it’s a lovely mixture of order and chaos. I realize we need symbols and rituals to help us stay focused on what’s really important and I’ll respect all religions for supplying those rituals but I think our daily lives supply us with all the symbols we need in order to learn how to live. The stones and trees and animals, the evening news, every little thing is a lesson. All we need are opened eyes and hearts. That’s my home-made religion.
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