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STATISTICS:
The vast majority of Kuwaiti women are employed in the public sector. Women generally receive equal pay for equal work in public and private sector jobs in Kuwait.
In the U.S., seven-in-ten (71%) people ages 65 and older want to shield their way of life from foreign influence, while just over half (55%) of those ages 18 to 29 agree.
One Fine Day (film)
Swati Gupta
IndiaGALLERYCONVERSATION
 Media Center
For me, an Indian woman, moving out from India alone at the age of twenty-two years was a big landmark in my life. I was raised with the same privileges a boy child would have had in my family. Today, I am independent and free marry the person I like.

Our generation of women is changing, for the better. My grandmother, or even my mother thirty years ago, didn’t have a say in who she married, nor was she given the choice of having a career. We, the generation of today, are ready to take risks and make use of our capabilities. More women are leaving their homes; we are facing violence, exploitation. But at the same time we are learning to fight back and to remind everyone of our equality with men.

My submission is an imaginary anecdote of a woman, dressed up in a traditional Indian sari, trying to be herself, moving away from more conservative and traditional ideas. Nobody would expect her to do what she is doing. This is the type of world I wish to create through my art work, a world where there are no boundaries for women, but where we accept them as they are, as they want to be.
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