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Missing Cambodia
Loung Ung - World Pulse Magazine
CambodiaGALLERYCONVERSATION
Cambodia will always possess my heart and soul. Before the war, my early years were filled with innocence, magic, and family.
I was twenty-five when I went back for the first time on my way home from attending the Beijing Women’s Conference. I had to revisit Cambodia to start the healing process and to overcome the fear of war that I carried in my heart, mind, and soul.
Going back changed my life. When I returned from my first trip, I knew that I wanted to spend my life working on issues related to Cambodia and the landmine crisis. Within months, I had left my job as an advocate at a domestic violence shelter, packed my bags, and moved to Washington DC. I found the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation, and was hired as a spokesperson for the Campaign for a Landmine Free World (CLFW).
My mission now is to give people who have survived wars a chance to survive peacetime. Since 1980, I have benefited from living in America. First of all, I haven’t had to fight soldiers, go hungry, die from curable illnesses, or get blown to bits by landmines. In America, there was no question that I would survive the peace time. America has given me a home and I love it here. I love my friends, the generous people with whom I work, the culture, and the freedom.
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