Quantcast IMOW - Raising a Child in Iran's Cultural Divide
Artículos
Temas
Amor
Relaciones en tiempos cambiantes. Vea las historias>>

El Dinero
Las mujeres que trabajan hablan sobre finanzas. Vea las historias>>

Cultura y Conflicto
¿Estamos destinadas a no estar de acuerdo? Vea las historias>>

El Futuro
Visualizar los próximos 30 años. Vea las historias>>

Lo mas destacado
Historias destacadas en películas, arte, música y más. Vea las historias>>

Guerra y diálogo
Hablando desde la guerra. Abogando por la paz. Vea las historias>>

Hombres jóvenes
Nuestra generación: hablan los hombres jóvenes. Vea las historias>>

Maternidad
Las mujeres se sinceran sobre el embarazo, la crianza de los hijos y la elección. Vea las historias>>

Imagen e identidad
Las apariencias no son todo, ¿o sí? Vea las historias>>

Festival de cine online
31 películas de directoras de todo el mundo. Vea las historias>>

Definiendo a una generación
¿Quiénes son las mujeres jóvenes hoy? Vea las historias>>

Lo mejor del concurso
Vinieron, vieron y comentaron. Aquí están los ganadores. Vea las historias>>
Conversación
¿Qué define a su generación de mujeres?
Tema seleccionado



PÁGINA DE INICIO  |   PRUEBA PRINCIPAL     |   ARTÍCULOS     |  CONVERSACIÓN    |  EVENTOS  |  TOMAR MEDIDAS  |  ACERCA DE
Búsqueda:  
  IR  
REGISTRAR  |  INICIAR SESIÓN Cambiar Idioma»    Invite a un amigo »
Raising a Child in Iran's Cultural Divide
Azadeh Moaveni
IránGALERÍACONVERSACIÓN
My friend's eight-year-old son brought a DVD home from school the other day, a 10-minute collection of "highlights"...
When I first discovered I was pregnant, and my husband and I discussed starting our family here in Iran, I thought mostly about bassinettes, prenatal tests, and how much a baby would adore the animal reliefs at Persepolis. I knew we would be raising our child between cultures - we both come from Iranian families, but grew up in the West and are familiar with the discomforts of living in between.
Coping with the gulf between Iranian private and public life is an intricate skill that even adults here manage with varying degrees of success. Wearing masks or lying when required, all while keeping your core identity intact, is the daily business of adults who live in authoritarian societies.
The very idea that I would be competing with my child's teachers and other role models over basic values (the role of religion in daily life, whether or not Western culture is corrupt) is intimidating. What if they win out, even for a phase? What's even scarier is that by doing the right thing - poising your kid's mind against extremist mullahs and their dogma - you may not be instilling tolerance, but safety hazards.
Kids seem prone to asking endless questions from the moment they can talk. They want to know why you wear a veil outside in Tehran, but not at home and not on trips. The right answer (Mommy doesn't believe in the veil, but the government denies her right to choose) could be punishable, if repeated by a child in a classroom.
Vea Artículo Completo »
ARTÍCULOS RELACIONADOS (20)

 
Itzel Martínez Del Canizo
México

Soy madre desde hace solo un año, pero mi...
IR AL ARTÍCULO »

Cristina Teresa O'Keeffe
Estados Unidos
This poem is an attempt to address the complicated roles and...
IR AL ARTÍCULO »
Nina Paley
Estados Unidos
Bundle of Joy or Population Bomb? 
IR AL ARTÍCULO »
Marizilda Cruppe – EVE Photographers
Brasil
Luciana es una adolescente de 16 años, embarazada por...
IR AL ARTÍCULO »

©Derechos Reservados 2008 International Museum of Women / Política de Privacidad y Descargo de Responsabilidad / Traducido por 101 Translations / Cambiar Idioma
El contenido de esta exhibición no necesariamente representa las opiniones del International Museum of Women, o sus socios o patrocinadores.