Quantcast IMOW - Raising a Child in Iran's Cultural Divide
Histoires
Thème
Amour
Les Relations dans des périodes de changement. Voir les Histoires>>

L’Argent
Les Femmes actives parlent finances. Voir les Histoires>>

Culture et Conflit
Sommes-nous voués au désaccord? Voir les Histoires>>

Le futur
Imaginez les prochaines 30 années. Voir les Histoires>>

Oeuvres Essentiels
Les meilleures histoires cinématographiques, artistiques, musicales et autres. Voir les Histoires>>

Guerre & Dialogue
Parler de guerre. Prôner la paix. Voir les Histoires>>

Jeunes Hommes
Notre génération: De jeunes hommes s’expriment. Voir les Histoires>>

Maternité
Les femmes parlent franchement de la grossesse, du statut de parent et du choix. Voir les Histoires>>

Image et Identité
Les apparences ne sont pas tout, n’est-ce pas? Voir les Histoires>>

Festival du film en ligne
31 films de réalisatrices du monde entier. Voir les Histoires>>

Définition d’une Génération
Qui sont les jeunes femmes d’aujourd’hui? Voir les Histoires>>

Concours Best Of
Vous êtes venu, vous avez vu, vous avez voté. Voir les Histoires>>
Conversation
Qu’est ce qui définit votre génération de femmes?
thème choisi



ACCUEIL  |  EXPOSITION PRINCIPALE    |   HISTOIRES     |  CONVERSATION    |  EVENEMENTS  |  AGISSEZ  |  A PROPOS DE
Recherche:  
  ALLER  
ENREGISTRER  |  SE CONNECTER Changer de langue»    Invitez une amie »
Raising a Child in Iran's Cultural Divide
Azadeh Moaveni
IranGALERIECONVERSATION
My friend's eight-year-old son brought a DVD home from school the other day, a 10-minute collection of "highlights"...
When I first discovered I was pregnant, and my husband and I discussed starting our family here in Iran, I thought mostly about bassinettes, prenatal tests, and how much a baby would adore the animal reliefs at Persepolis. I knew we would be raising our child between cultures - we both come from Iranian families, but grew up in the West and are familiar with the discomforts of living in between.
Coping with the gulf between Iranian private and public life is an intricate skill that even adults here manage with varying degrees of success. Wearing masks or lying when required, all while keeping your core identity intact, is the daily business of adults who live in authoritarian societies.
The very idea that I would be competing with my child's teachers and other role models over basic values (the role of religion in daily life, whether or not Western culture is corrupt) is intimidating. What if they win out, even for a phase? What's even scarier is that by doing the right thing - poising your kid's mind against extremist mullahs and their dogma - you may not be instilling tolerance, but safety hazards.
Kids seem prone to asking endless questions from the moment they can talk. They want to know why you wear a veil outside in Tehran, but not at home and not on trips. The right answer (Mommy doesn't believe in the veil, but the government denies her right to choose) could be punishable, if repeated by a child in a classroom.
Voir histoire complète »
SUJETS LIES (20)

 
Itzel Martínez Del Canizo
Mexique

Je ne suis mère que depuis un an, mais mon...
ALLEZ À L'HISTOIRE »

Cristina Teresa O'Keeffe
Etats Unis
This poem is an attempt to address the complicated roles and...
ALLEZ À L'HISTOIRE »
Nina Paley
Etats Unis
Bundle of Joy or Population Bomb? 
ALLEZ À L'HISTOIRE »
Marizilda Cruppe – EVE Photographers
Brésil
Luciana est une adolescente de 16 ans, enceinte de son...
ALLEZ À L'HISTOIRE »

©Copyright 2008 International Museum of Women / Politique de respect de la vie privée et démenti / Traduction : 101translations / Changer de langue
Le contenu de cette exposition ne représente pas nécessairement les avis du International Museum of Women, ou ses partenaires et sponsors.